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The Wisdom of Barnyard Bruke: "Reflect'n on Presidents, Quote on Debt President Jefferson, Farmers' Freedom"

Reflections on Presidents

Greetings to ever one in western Illinois and all readers of The Quill.

Last weeks editorial from Dessa, on Ronald Reagan, was very enterest'n. This week is Lincoln's birthday,

Ash Wednesday, and Valentine's day. Monday we celebrate Washington's birthday, which actually is February 22, however, celebrat'n Presidents day on Monday gives a longer weekend and no mail being proposed for Saturdays in the future, no one can accuse us of not give'n those folks enough time to enjoy life.

Quote on Debt

Recently, a quote was given me from March 2006 which is worth recirculating. It goes as follows:

"The fact that we are here today to debate raising America's debt limit is a sign of leadership failure. It is a sign that the US Government cannot pay its own bills. It is a sign that we now depend on ongoing financial assistance from foreign countries to finance our Government's reckless fiscal policies. Increasing America's debt weakens us domestically and internationally.

Leadership means that, "the buck stops here." Instead, Washington is shifting the burden of bad choices today onto the backs of our children and grandchildren. America has a debt problem and a failure of leadership. Americans deserve better." Senator Barack H. Obama, March 2006.

Apparently President Obama's teleprompter has changed it's script since Senator Obama spoke those words back in 2006.

Thomas Jefferson

Another remarkable President was Thomas Jefferson. A summary of him is as follows:

Thomas Jefferson was a very remarkable man who started learning very early in life and never stopped.

At 5, began studying under his cousin's tutor.

At 9, studied Latin, Greek and French.

At 14, studied classical literature and additional languages.

At 16, entered the College of William and Mary.

At 19, studied Law for 5 years starting under George Wythe.

At 23, started his own law practice.

At 25, was elected to the Virginia House of Burgesses.

At 31, wrote the widely circulated "Summary View of the Rights of British America? And retired from his law practice.

At 32, was a Delegate to the Second Continental Congress.

At 33, wrote the Declaration of Independence.

At 33, took three years to revise Virginia's legal code and wrote a Public Education bill and a statute for Religious Freedom.

At 36, was elected the second Governor of Virginia succeeding Patrick Henry.

At 40, served in Congress for two years.

At 41, was the American minister to France and negotiated commercial treaties with European nations along with Ben Franklin and John Adams.

At 46, served as the first Secretary of State under George Washington.

At 53, served as Vice President and was elected president of the American Philosophical Society.

At 55, drafted the Kentucky Resolutions.

At 57, was elected the third president of the United States.

At 60 obtained the Louisiana Purchase doubling the nation's size.

At 61, was elected to a second term as President.

At 65, retired to Monticello.

At 80, helped President Monroe shape the Monroe Doctrine.

At 81, almost single-handedly created the University of Virginia and served as its first president.

At 83, died on the 50th anniversary of the Signing of the Declaration of Independence along with John Adams.

Thomas Jefferson knew because he himself studied the previous failed attempts at government. He understood actual history, the nature of God, his laws and the nature of man. That happens to be way more than what most understand today. Jefferson really knew his stuff. A voice from the past to lead us in the future:

John F. Kennedy held a dinner in the White House for a group of the brightest minds in the nation at that time. He made this statement: "This is perhaps the assembly of the most intelligence ever to gather at one time in the White House with the exception of when Thomas Jefferson dined alone."

"When we get piled upon one another in large cities, as in Europe, we shall become as corrupt as Europe." - Thomas Jefferson

"The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." --Thomas Jefferson

"It is incumbent on every generation to pay its own debts as it goes. A principle which if acted on would save one-half the wars of the world." --Thomas Jefferson

"I predict future happiness for Americans if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them."

--Thomas Jefferson

"My reading of history convinces me that most bad government results from too much government."

--Thomas Jefferson

"No free man shall ever be debarred the use of arms." --Thomas Jefferson

"The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government." --Thomas Jefferson

"The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants." --Thomas Jefferson

"To compel a man to subsidize with his taxes the propagation of ideas which he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical."

--Thomas Jefferson

"Thomas Jefferson said in 1802: "I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies.

If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around the banks will deprive the people of all property - until their children wake-up homeless on the continent their fathers conquered."

Golly Gee and I'll be jiggered if'n Jefferson's thoughts are surely most thought provoke'n as they apply government policy of recent times.

The boys and I will surely have some enterest'n discussions on these matters at one or two of our jaw'n sessions.

The quotes from Senator Obama and President Jefferson certainly are worth note'n in comparison to President Obama's actions dure'n his first and second terms of office to date.

Farmers Freedom Definition

What is freedom? Well, here is one version I like quite well:

I believe in freedom, freedom to work the soil and care for the land, and freedom to worship as I please, but I do not believe freedom is free. I believe a man's greatest possession is his dignity, and that no calling bestows this more abundantly than farming.

I believe hard work and honest sweat are the building blocks of a person's character.

I believe that farming, despite its hardships and disappointments, is the most honest and honorable way a man can spend his days on this earth.

I believe my children are learning values that will last a lifetime and can be learned in no other way.

I believe farming provides education for life and that no other occupation teaches so much about birth, growth, and maturity in such a variety of ways.

I believe many of the best things in life are indeed free: the splendor of a sunrise, the rapture of wide open spaces, the exhilarating sight of your land greening each spring.

I believe true happiness comes from watching your crops ripen in the field, your children growing tall in the sun, your whole family feeling the pride that springs from their shared experiences.

I believe that by my toil I am giving more to the world than I am taking from it, an honor that does not come to all men.

I believe my life will be measured ultimately by what I have done for my fellow men, and by this standard I fear no judgment.

I believe when a man grows old and sums up his days, he should be able to stand tall and feel pride in the life he has lived.

I believe in farming, because it makes all this possible.

Well, thar ya has it then - more thoughts to ponder on as ya goes through the week.

Remember - It is easier to preach ten sermons than it is to live one!

Hope'n to see youn's in church this weekend. Wherever ya is, what ever ya be a do'n, BE A GOOD ONE!

Keep on Smile'n

Catch ya Later